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Monthly Archives: August 2012

Baby Doe is on a Roll!

This week, Women Writing the West announced winners and finalists of the 2012 WILLA Literary awards. Lo and behold, Baby Doe Tabor: Matchless Silver Queen is a finalist in the Scholarly Nonfiction category, its second award this year after winning Best Biography from CIPA. What an honor! WILLA awards will be presented October 19-21 in Albuquerque, New Mexico at the Annual WWW Conference. Baby Doe, who loved jewels, now has gold and silver emblems for her book cover!

Best wishes, Joyce
http://www.LohseWorks.com

Silver WILLA

Women Writing the West
2012 WILLA Winners and Finalists:

CONTEMPORARY FICTION
Winner: *Wrecker: A Novel* by Summer Wood
Finalist: * Fracture* by Susan Cummins Miller
Finalist: *Seance in Sepia* by Michelle Black

CREATIVE NONFICTION
Winner: *Rightful Place* by Amy Hale Auker
Finalist: * Light on the Devils: Coming of Age on the Klamath* by
Louise Wagenknecht
Finalist: * Bull Canyon: A Boat Builder, A Writer, and Other
Wildlife*by Lin Pardey

SCHOLARLY NONFICTION
Winner: *Recollecting: Lives of Aboriginal Women of the Canadian
Northwest and Borderlands*, edited by Sarah Carter and Patricia McCormack
Finalist: *Baby Doe Tabor: Matchless Silver Queen* by Joyce B. Lohse

HISTORICAL FICTION
Winner: *The Bride’s House* by Sandra Dallas
Finalist: *Mercury’s Rise* by Ann Parker
Finalist: *A Race to Splendor* by Ciji Ware

POETRY
Winner: *Married Into It* by Patricia Frolander
Finalist: *The Singing Bowl* by Joan Logghe
Finalist: *Dirt Songs: A Plains Duet* by Linda M. Hasselstrom and
Twyla M. Hansen

ORIGINAL SOFTCOVER* *FICTION
* *Winner: *The American Cafe *by Sara Sue Hoklotubbe
Finalist: *Captive Trail* by Susan Page Davis
Finalist: *Unbridled* by Tammy Hinton

CHILDREN’S/YOUNG ADULT FICTION AND NONFICTION
Winner: *The Year We Were Famous* by Carole Estby Dagg
Finalist: *Forgiven* by Janet Fox
Finalist: *A Book for Black-Eyed Susan* by Judy Young

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Posted by on August 17, 2012 in Western history, Writing Life

 

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WHERE are you?

Oak Ridge Abe Lincoln

A rub of the nose on Abe Lincoln’s bust by his tomb assures good luck.

When you visit cemeteries to collect data and photos for your family research this summer, don’t forget to notice your surroundings. My term for this important element is “territorial context.” This information will serve you well if you share directions to the location with another person, or if you ever return to that location. You need to answer and record information about certain aspects of your destination. What direction are you facing? What landmarks do you see? Who are the neighbors?

This summer, I visited ancestors buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery in Springfield, Illinois. Although I was not equipped with a GPS, I had done my homework. A library book provided me with a detailed map of the cemetery, and internment forms I obtained previously contained lot numbers. More importantly, when I visited the site previously, I knew a remarkable landmark stood a short distance from the site. My family was a stone’s throw from Abraham Lincoln’s Tomb. You could not miss it. That detail told us we were near the family plot.

Illinois Cemetery

Where am I?

During the same trip, we visited another little pioneer family cemetery, which was not so easy to locate. When the paved road disappeared, we wondered if we were on the right course with barely visible ruts to lead us on. Corn fields in all directions blocked our view. Which way were we going? The sun was overhead, and we had no large landmark to guide us. But we pushed on until we came to a clearing surrounded by robust crops. This was the place. Next time, it will be much easier to find. Next time.

Illinois Cemetery 3

Another view provides territorial context.

Joyce Lohse
http://www.LohseWorks.com

 
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Posted by on August 2, 2012 in Family history

 

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